Mobile Device Management Reduces Costs and Eases IT Stress

By: Albert McKeon| - Leave a comment

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Keeping up with the necessary updates for just one mobile device is challenging. Imagine trying to stay on top of the updates, applications and security of hundreds or thousands of devices.

Welcome to the world of an IT pro who must endlessly worry about mobile device management, tasked with maintaining a throng of laptops, smartphones and tablets that his colleagues bring to the office or use on the road. A bring-your-own-device (BYOD) policy offers a lifeline for employees who need to stay on top of work no matter what, when or where.

Ensuring that employees don’t abuse BYOD guidelines on usage and security can be a tall order for IT departments already juggling infrastructure, network management and communications. But IT can finally rest easy and leave the handling of devices to another group of pros: a managed mobility service.

Mobile Device Management for Busy IT

As many mobile-first businesses have learned the hard way, the mobility industry has many players. A mobile service provider might sell and repair device hardware, but it probably won’t cover the onboarding of employees. That task is often left to IT, which also has to answer requests, manage business applications and hold a few hands. On top of that, IT also has to handle the complex responsibility of device security.

The purchasing, integration, security and management of hundreds of company-owned and BYOD devices is an arduous, time-consuming process. Managed mobility services (MMS) works to make IT’s job easier. MMS is a package of services that support widespread device use so that companies can realize their potential while IT receives much-needed help on security and other management responsibilities. With MMS, employees can continue to access enterprise data from their devices and not put their employers at risk of a security breach.

Knowing What You Need

Gartner outlines the core deliverables that MMS providers offer enterprises, including:

  • Sourcing and logistics management: the systems and services used to purchase, provision and activate mobile network services and mobile devices.
  • Mobile service management: the systems and services used to inventory and audit mobile network contracts and mobile devices, including logging users’ mobile network service usage, performance and availability.
  • Program and financial management: a service acting as an agent on behalf of an enterprise with third-party providers, such as mobile network operators, independent software vendors, device manufacturers and resellers.

According to Computerworld, 451 Research recommends that enterprises develop a strategy before choosing an MMS provider. They suggest that businesses:

  • Take an inventory of devices and determine which ones are deployed and whether they’re company-issued or BYOD.
  • Know whether mobile devices are for field-service jobs with critical business apps or for general-knowledge workers who may not need expedited repairs or replacements.
  • Check if an MMS handles hardware, software or both. Ensure that the MMS service-level agreement includes turnaround times on hardware repairs and replacements as well as software provisioning.

Delivering Cost Savings

MMS not only reduces stress levels in IT but also delivers savings. Subscription-based models save money when compared to costly upfront implementation costs. IT will also have the freedom to pursue important projects that can drive revenue, instead of spending time staying on top of the latest mobile software update or security bug.

With MMS, enterprises can ensure their employees have uninterrupted mobile access to data while boosting productivity and keeping costs under control. That’s something to text about.

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About The Author

Albert McKeon

Freelance Writer

Albert McKeon covers technology, health, business, politics and entertainment. He previously worked as a newspaper reporter for 16 years on the staffs of The Telegraph (N.H.) and Boston Herald, winning the New England Press Association’s Journalist of the Year award and other honors. He now writes as a freelancer for several magazines and news outlets, and creates content for organizations such as Massachusetts General Hospital and Boston College.

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