Workers With These Tech Skills Can Expect Big Opportunities in 2017

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By: Jacqueline Lee|

With 50,000 to 1 million IT jobs going unfilled every year, workers with in-demand tech skills are gold in the job market. Jason Hayman of IT staffing firm TEKsystems recently confirmed to Computerworld that the demand for tech talent far exceeds the supply. “The takeaway is there aren’t enough of these workers,” he said.

Computerworld’s recent Forecast 2017 survey revealed employers’ wish lists for their IT departments. And when it comes to hiring, IT leaders need staff with eight specific skillsets, and they need them fast.

1. Programming and Application Development for Tech Skills

Businesses are looking for developers who can customize existing applications, improve APIs and build proprietary software. Jack Mullen, president of IT staffing firm Modis, told Computerworld that some employers are offering a 15-percent raise over a programmer’s current salary to those who are willing to make the move.

2. Helpdesk Personnel

Most IT workers view the helpdesk as an entry-level job. Nonetheless, demand is high, particularly for technicians with Tier 2 and Tier 3 expertise. Businesses rely on traditional technologies, but they’re also facing an influx of emerging technologies, including cloud services and internet-of-everything (IoE) devices. Employees also rely on their personal devices in the workplace, forcing them to cope with the demand that content consumption places on their networks.

3. Security and Compliance Professionals

An evolving threat landscape and a shortage of qualified personnel mean unemployment for security professionals is low. Employers look for certifications like CompTIA’s Security+ and Certified Information Systems Security Professional (CISSP) as signs that security professionals have the tech skills for the job.

4. Cloud Computing

Cloud architects, software engineers with public cloud experience and DevOps engineers are all high in demand, as are SysAdmins and network administrators with cloud experience. Over one quarter of employees plan to hire cloud-capable professionals in 2017, the survey reports.

5. Business Intelligence and Big Data

Along with the influx of new devices into the workplace comes a tsunami of potentially actionable data. The best candidates have experience with specific programming and database administration languages, like SQL. Experience with technologies like Hadoop and Oracle are also a big advantage.

6. Web Developers

The demand to integrate mobile capabilities and social media into both new and existing websites is driving demand for both on-site and freelance web developers. The Bureau of Labor Statistics expects demand for web development jobs to grow 27 percent by 2024.

7. Project Management

In addition to specific tech skills, employers want to hire people who can guide IT projects from start to finish. As a result, tech-savvy certified project management professionals (PMP) are in high demand.

8. Mobile Developers and Enterprise Mobility Management

Employees rely on their personal devices in the workplace, forcing employers to cope with heavier bandwidth demands, security and data protection concerns. More employers also see revenue opportunities in creating proprietary mobile apps, which are increasing demand for mobile developers.

Overall, Computerworld says IT job growth is expected to expand at a rate of 12 percent. The right tech skills can create major business opportunities for employers, and provide a great negotiating position for employees.

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About The Author

Jacqueline Lee

Freelance Writer

Jacqueline Lee specializes in business and technology writing, drawing on over 10 years of experience in business, management and entrepreneurship. Currently, she blogs for HireVue and IBM, and her work on behalf of client brands has appeared in Huffington Post, Forbes, Entrepreneur and Inc. Magazine. In addition to writing, Jackie works as a social media manager and freelance editor. She's a member of the American Copy Editors Society and is completing a certificate in editing from the Poynter Institute.

Articles by Jacqueline Lee
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